Kim Renee Dunbar
Kim Renee Dunbar - 5 Prestigious Awards

5 Prestigious Awards Received by Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar

Kim Renee Dunbar’s Notable Awards for her Research in the Inorganic Chemistry Field

Kim Renee DunbarKim Renee Dunbar has received many awards for her work in science and chemistry. The professor received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Purdue University and is a University Distinguished Professor and is the Davidson Professor of Science in the chemistry department at Texas A&M University. Here are five of the notable awards Kim Renee Dunbar has received.

  1. 2018 Royal Society of Chemistry Fellow

Kim Renee Dunbar was named a 2018 Royal Society of Chemistry Fellow to recognize her global contributions to chemistry. Her research in synthetic and structural inorganic chemistry focuses on the application or coordination chemistry principles to the solution of problems, ranging from new conducting materials to anticancer agents. The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community with more than 54,000 members and a 175-year history. “It was a huge honor to be recognized by the Royal Society of Chemistry, which I have been a member of for many years,” said Kim Renee Dunbar.

  1. Basola Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry

Kim Renee Dunbar was chosen as the recipient of the prestigious 2019 Basola Medal for

Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry to celebrate her career achievements over the last three decades. The award is presented each year by Northwestern University and co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society Chicago Section.

 

“I am deeply honored to receive this medal,” said Kim Renee Dunbar. She knew Fred Basolo,

who the award is named for. “He and I had many long talks, and he regaled me with stories

about the history of coordination chemistry,” Kim Renee Dunbar said. “He was a wonderful role model and an inspiration to me.”

 

  1. President’s Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers   

 

In 2015, Kim Renee Dunbar was awarded the President’s Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, one of six people to receive the award that year. It was given for her leadership and advocacy for underrepresented communities in STEM fields.

  1. American Chemical Society Award Winner

 

In 2015, Kim Renee Dunbar was an American Chemical Society award winner. She received the ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry. Kim Renee Dunbar was praised for her “outstanding achievements in the field of coordination compounds as magnetic and conducting materials and for extraordinary service in inorganic chemistry.”

 

  1. Texas A&M Women Former Students’ Network Eminent Scholar Award

 

Kim Renee Dunbar was selected as the first recipient of the Texas A&M Women Former Students’ Network Eminent Scholar Award in 2012. This award was created to highlight the contributions of the university’s women faculty who demonstrate exceptional achievement in research, scholarship, artistic and creative pursuits, and engagement.

Kim Renee Dunbar - 2019 Basola Medal for Outstanding Research

2019 Basola Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry Awarded to Kim Renee Dunbar

Kim Renee Dunbar Receives Honor for Research, Years of Service in Inorganic Chemistry Field

 

Kim Renee DunbarKim Renee Dunbar was chosen as the winner of the prestigious 2019 Basola Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry to celebrate her career achievements over the last three decades.

 

The award is presented each year by Northwestern University and co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society Chicago Section.

 

“I am deeply honored to receive this medal,” said Kim Renee Dunbar. She knew Fred Basolo, who the award is named for. “He and I had many long talks, and he regaled me with stories about the history of coordination chemistry,” Kim Renee Dunbar said. “He was a wonderful role model and an inspiration to me.”

 

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the Texas A&M Department of Chemistry faculty in 1999 and is the holder of the Davidson Chair in Science. She has received much recognition in her time in the department, including being named a University Distinguished Professor in 2007, and was the first female chair holder in the history of the college.

 

Kim Renee Dunbar specializes in synthetic, structural and physical inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry.

 

The research in synthetic and structural inorganic chemistry that Kim Renee Dunbar has conducted over the past twenty years in the Texas A&M Department of Chemistry has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, the ACS-Petroleum Research Fund and the Welsh Foundation among others.

 

This research is focused on the application of coordination chemistry principles to the solution of diverse problems in the field of Inorganic Chemistry. Kim Renee Dunbar’s research makes use of a wide range of tools, including spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, electronic absorption spectroscopy,  magnetometry, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry.

 

The Fred Basolo Medal was established by the former students of Fred Basolo in appreciation for his contributions to inorganic chemistry at Northwestern University and to the advancement of the field worldwide. Basolo arrived at Northwestern University in 1946 and was a key player in establishing the stellar reputation of Inorganic Chemistry at Northwestern.

 

“The list of previous recipients include many of my inorganic chemistry idols, mentors and friends,” said Kim Renee Dunbar. “It is a privilege to be recognized alongside so many inspiring leaders and innovators in the field of inorganic chemistry.”

 

Kim Renee Dunbar is no stranger to being honored for her accomplishments. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the American Institute of Chemists and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received the 2015 ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, a 2015 National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers President’s Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship and a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, an Honorary degree from her undergraduate alma mater Westminster College,  as well as many other honors awards throughout her 30-year career including the Graduate Mentoring Award and the Distinguished Research Award from the Association of Former Students at Texas A&M. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a Fellow of the American Chemical Society.

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One of the world’s leading chemists is at Texas A&M – Kim Renee Dunbar

Distinguished Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar has been at the University since 1999

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the faculty of the Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years. A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Kim Renee Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012. Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Kim Renee Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science.

Kim Renee Dunbar speaks at events around the world. The Latin American Molecular Magnetism community hosted the 16th International Conference on Molecule-based Magnets – ICMM2018 – in Rio de Janeiro, on September 1st through September 5th 2018. Kim Renee Dunbar gave one of four plenary lectures at the conference and was one of many distinguished scientists from around the world to attend. Kim Dunbar sits on the governing committee as a member of the International Advisory Board.

This recognition is due to Kim Renee Dunbar’s great work and research. Kim Renee Dunbar is an internationally recognized expert on synthetic, structural and physical inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. Much of her work, funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, the American Chemical Society-Petroleum Research Fund and the Welch Foundation, is focused on problems at the interface of materials and biological chemistry including organocyanide based functional materials, which was featured in an editorial celebrating Women in Chemistry in 2011[6]published in celebration of the International Year of Chemistry.

Just recently, Kim Renee Dunbar has received the 2019 Basolo Medal for Outstanding Research in Organic Chemistry

The Basolo Medal is awarded annually by Northwestern University and the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society in recognition of outstanding research in organic chemistry. The award is named after Frank Basolo, the late Northwestern Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, who made significant contributions to the advancement of inorganic chemistry and served as President of the American Chemical Society in 1983.

“I am deeply honored to receive this medal,” Dunbar said. “The list of previous recipients include many of my inorganic chemistry idols, mentors and friends. I knew Fred Basolo quite well, and he took an interest in me when I was a young professor. He and I had many long talks, and he regaled me with stories about the history of coordination chemistry. He was a wonderful role model and an inspiration to me.”

Kim Renee Dunbar - Texas A&M First Female Chair

Texas A&M Sees First Female Chair In the College of Science at Texas A&M University with Kim Renee Dunbar

Kim Renee Dunbar became the first female chair holder in the College’s history

 

Kim Renee DunbarTexas A&M University Chemistry Professor Dr. Kim R. Dunbar was appointed as a Davidson Professor of Science and holder of the Davidson Chair in Science according to an announcement by Dr. H. Joseph Newton, dean of Texas A&M’s College of Science in 2004.

 

Dunbar is the first female chair holder in the College’s history, joined the A&M faculty in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University. Previously she had carried out postdoctoral research at A&M from 1985-86 under the direction of the late Distinguished Professor of Chemistry F. Albert Cotton after earning a Bachelor of Science degree from Westminster College and a doctorate from Purdue University. Dunbar’s research in synthetic and structural inorganic chemistry, which is focused on problems in materials and biological chemistry, has earned her multiple honors, including an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship and a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award.

 

Also in 2004, Kim Renee Dunbar was honored with a Purdue University Outstanding Alumni Award. Following these distinguished honors, Dunbar has earned numerous awards made a number of outstanding achievements. Kim Renee Dunbar was selected to receive the 2015 ACS Award for Distinguished Service in Inorganic Chemistry for her outstanding achievements in the field of molecular magnetism. The announcement was first published in the August 2015 issue of Chemical & Engineering News. Kim Renee Dunbar is the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate Editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years.

 

A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Kim Renee Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012.

 

Kim Dunbar is the author of more than 380 publications that include scientific articles, conference papers, reviews, and book chapters. An international expert in synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry, Dunbar joined the Texas A&M Department of Chemistry in 1999 after serving a number of years on the faculty at Michigan State University.

 

Finally, in 2019 Kim Renee Dunbar was awarded the 2019 Basolo Medal for Outstanding Research in Organic Chemistry, solidifying her place as a distinguished professor of chemistry at Texas A&M.

The Basolo Medal is awarded annually by Northwestern University and the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society in recognition of outstanding research in organic chemistry. The award is named after Frank Basolo, the late Northwestern Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, who made significant contributions to the advancement of inorganic chemistry and served as President of the American Chemical Society in 1983. 

Kim Renee Dunbar One of the United States Most Recognized Chemists

Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar One of the United States Most Recognized Chemists

Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar One of the United States Most Recognized Chemists

Over her decades long career in chemistry Kim Renee Dunbar has seen global success and recognition

 

Kim Renee DunbarKim Renee Dunbar joined the faculty of Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006.

 

Kim Renee Dunbar, since her return to Texas A&M in 1999, has become world-renowned for her research in several areas of physical and inorganic chemistry, including breakthroughs in organic/inorganic composite materials, molecular magnetism, and metal-based chemotherapy.

Kim Dunbar is the author of more than 360 publications that include scientific articles, conference papers, reviews, and book chapters; serves as associate editor of Inorganic Chemistry; and is past secretary and chair of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Inorganic Chemistry.

Kim Renee Dunbar has been honored with distinguished alumni awards from Westminster College and Purdue University.  Her professional honors include an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowship; a Camille and Henry Dreyfus teacher-scholar award; and fellowships in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemists, and the American Chemical Society.

In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, only the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history. She served as an Associate Editor of the premier journal in her field, the ACS journal  Inorganic Chemistry, for many years. A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar was the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner and she won the Inaugural Graduate Mentoring Award in addition to a Distinguished Research Award from Texas A&m University. In 2012, Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington and delivered the commencement address. Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Kim Renee Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science.

Kim Renee Dunbar, and her colleague Dr. Vickie M. Williamson, instructional assistant professor of chemistry, were selected to receive 2015 ACS Awards for outstanding achievements in the field of inorganic chemistry and chemical education respectively. The announcement was first published in the August 2015 issue of Chemical & Engineering News.

Kim Renee Dunbar also heads the Dunbar Research Group. The Dunbar Research describes their mission on their website by saying,

 

The Dunbar group conducts research in the area of inorganic chemistry, with an emphasis on coordination chemistry. We strive to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and physical properties in each specific application of our research. Our projects span the topics of molecular magnetism, anti-cancer compounds, and multifunctional materials with organic radicals. The variety of goals for our research provide the students in this group with the opportunity to expand their chemical knowledge outside the boundaries of their specialty.”

 

Most recently, In recognition of her career achievements across more than 30 years of chemical research, Kim Renee Dunbar was selected to receive the 2019 Basolo Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry. The award, presented annually by Northwestern University is co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society Chicago Section and named for the late Northwestern chemist Fred Basolo, who was the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and served as president of the ACS in 1983.

kim renee dunbar

2012 a Big Year for Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar

Kim Renee Dunbar received numerous awards and recognitions in 2012 adding to an illustrious career in Chemistry

An international expert in synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry, Dunbar joined the Texas A&M Department of Chemistry in 1999 after serving a number of years on the faculty at Michigan State University. In 2004, she was named a Davidson Professor of Science and a joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science. In 2007, she was named a distinguished professor of chemistry, Texas A&M’s highest academic faculty rank.

Kim Renee Dunbar as honored with first WFSN Eminent Scholar Award

“I am pleased to join with the Women Former Students’ Network in recognizing the accomplishments of this outstanding scholar and mentor,” said Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin. “Dr. Dunbar exemplifies our highest ideals as a university known for excellence in research as well as excellence in teaching.”

Kim Renee Dunbar also spoke at Texas Women’s University to celebrate Women in Science alongside other distinguished scientists and experts. Kim Dunbar presented the afternoon symposium. Dr. Dunbar presented “Anion-pi Supramolecular Interactions: An Overlooked and Exciting Tool for Chemists and Biologists.”

Additionally, Kim Renee Dunbar was honored at the commencement ceremony of Westminster College. The ceremony included the conferring of an honorary degree, Doctor of Science, honoris causa, on Dr. Kim R. Dunbar, Davidson Professor of Science at Texas A&M University, one of America’s premiere chemists, and a 1980 Westminster graduate.

The year before, The American Chemical Society named 213 members as ACS Fellows, including Kim Renee Dunbar. The new fellows were honored at the society’s fall national meeting in Denver.

“ACS is especially proud to honor these chemists during the 2011 International Year of Chemistry,” said ACS President Nancy B. Jackson in announcing the 2011 class of ACS Fellows. “The work they are doing will improve all of our lives as they unleash the power of chemistry to solve global challenges like providing clean water, sufficient food, new energy sources, and cures for disease. But that’s not all,” she noted. “They’re also organizing scientific conferences for their peers, doing outreach with scouts and schools, and being mentors to the next generation of scientists.”

Kim Renee Dunbar, since her return to Texas A&M in 1999, has become world-renowned for her research in several areas of physical and inorganic chemistry, including breakthroughs in organic/inorganic composite materials, molecular magnetism, and metal-based chemotherapy.

Kim Dunbar is the author of more than 380 publications that include scientific articles, conference papers, reviews, and book chapters and served as associate editor of Inorganic Chemistry for 12 years. She is past secretary and chair of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Inorganic Chemistry and recently served on the Executive Committee.

Kim Renee Dunbar has been honored with distinguished alumni awards from Westminster College and Purdue University. Her professional honors include an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowship; a Camille and Henry Dreyfus teacher-scholar award; and fellowships in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemists, and the American Chemical Society.

Kim Renee Dunbar

Texas A&M Chemist Kim Dunbar Earns 2015 American Chemical Society Award

Distinguished Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar Earns 2015 (ACS) American Chemical Society Award for Excellence in Chemistry

Globally recognized Texas A&M chemist and distinguished professor of chemistry, Kim Renee Dunbar, and her colleague Dr. Vickie M. Williamson, instructional assistant professor of chemistry, were selected to receive 2015 ACS Awards for outstanding achievements in the field of chemistry. The announcement was first published in the August 2015 issue of Chemical & Engineering News. Kim Dunbar was selected to receive the ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Strem Chemicals Inc. In the article Kim Dunbar is recognized for “outstanding achievements in the field of coordination compounds as magnetic and conducting materials and for extraordinary service in inorganic chemistry.”

The 249th ACS National Meeting & Exposition was held in Denver, Colorado where Kim Renee Dunbar was presented with a certificate and a $5,000 prize at the awards ceremony. The ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry was established in 1963 to recognize individuals who have advanced inorganic chemistry by significant service in addition to performance of outstanding research.

Dr. David H. Russell, Applied Biosystems/MDS Sciex Professor of Mass Spectrometry in Chemistry and Head of the Department of Chemistry said, “The chemistry department is highly recognized both nationally and internationally for leadership in research and education, as evidenced by these awards,” followed by, “Professor Dunbar is a leader in her field of research, and Dr. Williamson is equally regarded in her field of chemical education and research, both of which underscore the seminal role the Department of Chemistry plays with respect to the Texas A&M University mission of research and teaching in service to Texas.”

When asked about receiving the award Kim Dunbar said, “I am honored to be selected to join the ranks of the esteemed inorganic chemists and particularly my Texas A&M colleagues who have received this award over the past five decades,” Dunbar said. “I share this achievement with the many students, postdocs and collaborators who have generously shared their ideas, passion and insight with me. The award is not only for me but for all of them as well.”

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the faculty of Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years. A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012. Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Kim Renee Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science.

Kim Renee Dunbar Plenary Speaks

Congreso Nacional de Educación Química – Speaker Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar

Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar Plenary Speaker at Congreso Nacional de Educación Química 2013

Kim Renee DunbarWorld-renowned chemist Kim Renee Dunbar gives Plenary speech at the 32nd National Congress of Chemical education in Guanajuato Mexico

 

The Chemical Society of Mexico, AC and the University of Guanajuato invited students, professors, researchers such as Kim Renee Dunbar and industrial chemists to participate in the 48th Mexican Chemical Congress, 32nd National Congress of Chemical Education and the 2013 Chemical Expo on August 31 to September 4, 2013, in the City of Guanajuato, Mexico, at the Hotel Real de Minas, where Kim Renee Dunbar gave a plenary speech.

 

The Chemical Society of Mexico (Sociedad Química de México; SQM) is a learned society (professional association) based in Mexico which supports scientific inquiry and education in the field of chemistry and were very happy to invite and have chemist Kim Renee Dunbar in attendance

 

Chemical Society of Mexico, AC, is a National Organization founded on March 16, 1956

Constituted on August 27 of the same year, by a group of illustrious chemists headed by the Chemists Rafael Illescas Frisbie and José Ignacio Bolivar Goyanes the Chemical Engineers Manuel Madrazo Garamendi, Guillermo Cortina Anciola and the QFB. María del Consuelo Hidalgo Mondragón.

 

Since its foundation, the Chemical Society of Mexico has brought together professionals and students of the chemical sciences; in addition to those interested in the development and strengthening of chemistry in the country, both in the industrial and academic sectors. Kim Renee Dunbar is often invited to national chemistry events to speak on her research.

 

The Society organizes two annual congresses, one for general chemistry and the other for chemical education. The Society also publishes the Journal of the Mexican Chemical Society (prior to 2005, Revista de la Sociedad Química de México). It also awards the annual Andrés Manuel Del Río and Mario Molina Prizes, as well as prizes for the best theses in chemistry at bachelors, masters and doctoral level.

 

In the next 10 years with Kim Dunbar

SQM will be the leading organization in the field of chemistry professional organizations in Mexico, with credibility and representation at a national and international level; increasing its contribution to the strengthening of the professional and academic sector, supported by its administrative transparency, commitments with its associates and participation in forums of public interest, as well as seeking the development of the human resources that comprise it.

 

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the faculty of Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate Editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years.

 

A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012.

 

Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Kim Renee Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science. 

Kim Renee Dunbar

Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar to win 2019 Basolo Award after being named Royal Society of Chemistry Fellow in 2018

Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar adds another accolade to a decorated and renowned career in Chemistry

Globally renowned Texas A&M chemist, Kim Renee Dunbar, was named a Royal Society of Chemistry Fellow in 2018. The honor is another of the many awards and accomplishments of Dunbar recognizing her outstanding contributions to chemistry research over the past 25 years.

The Royal Society of Chemistry, based in the UK, brings together chemists from all over the world, with 54,000 members. The Royal Society of Chemistry is a not-for-profit organization that was founded nearly 175 years ago at the intersection of industry, academia, and government to shape the future of chemical science and promote the talent, information and ideas that lead to great advances in science for the betterment of humanity.

Other Texas A&M chemists who have received the honor include Sarbajit Banerjee (2016), Hongcai Joe Zhou (2015), Marcetta Y. Darensbourg (2014), Kevin Burgess (2013), Abraham Clearfield (2013), François P. Gabbaï (2013) and James D. Batteas (2012).

Dr. Simon W. North, professor and head of Texas A&M Chemistry praised Dunbar saying, “Kim is widely recognized as an international leader in the field of inorganic chemistry…Not only has she made seminal contributions in several areas, she has an outstanding record of service to the scientific community.”

At the end of 2018 Kim Renee Dunbar was selected to receive the 2019 Basolo Award. The Basolo Medal is awarded annually by Northwestern University and the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society in recognition of outstanding research in inorganic chemistry. The award is named after Frank Basolo, the late Northwestern Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, who made significant contributions to the advancement of inorganic chemistry and served as President of the American Chemical Society in 1983.

On winning the Basolo Medal, Kim Renee Dunbar said, “I am deeply honored to receive this medal. The list of previous recipients includes many of my inorganic chemistry idols, mentors and friends. I knew Fred Basolo quite well, and he took an interest in me when I was a young professor. He and I had many long talks, and he regaled me with stories about the history of coordination chemistry. He was a wonderful role model and an inspiration to me.”

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years. A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012. Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science.

Texas A&M Chemist Kim Renee Dunbar Awarded 2019 Basolo Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry

Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Texas A&M, Kim Renee Dunbar has received the 2019 Basolo Medal for Outstanding Research in Inorganic Chemistry

The Basolo Medal is awarded annually by Northwestern University and the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society in recognition of outstanding research in inorganic chemistry. The award is named after Frank Basolo, the late Northwestern Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, who made significant contributions to the advancement of inorganic chemistry and served as President of the American Chemical Society in 1983.

Kim Renee Dunbar is an internationally recognized expert on synthetic, structural and physical inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. Much of her work, funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, the American Chemical Society-Petroleum Research Fund and the Welch Foundation, is focused on problems at the interface of materials and biological chemistry including organocyanide based functional materials, which was featured in an editorial celebrating Women in Chemistry in 2011[6]published in celebration of the International Year of Chemistry.

“I am deeply honored to receive this medal,” Kim Renee Dunbar said. “The list of previous recipients include many of my inorganic chemistry idols, mentors and friends. I knew Fred Basolo quite well, and he took an interest in me when I was a young professor. He and I had many long talks, and he regaled me with stories about the history of coordination chemistry. He was a wonderful role model and an inspiration to me.”

Kim Renee Dunbar joined the faculty of the Department of Chemistry of Texas A&M in 1999 after serving on the faculty at Michigan State University for 12 years where she was named a University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2015, Dunbar received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, the second female recipient of the ACS’s top award for inorganic chemistry in its 52-year history and has served as an Associate editor of the ACS inorganic Chemistry journal for many years. A leader in both chemical research and education, Kim Renee Dunbar is the first female Texas A&M Former Students’ Network (WFSN) Eminent Scholar Award winner. In 2012, Dunbar was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from her undergraduate alma mater at Westminster College in New Wilmington in 2012. Prior to that, in 2004, Texas A&M named Dunbar the first Davidson Professor of Science and joint holder of the Davidson Chair in Science, meriting particular distinction as the first female chair holder in the College of Science.

Over the course of her career, Kim Renee Dunbar has contributed broadly to the development of inorganic coordination chemistry and materials science which has resulted in over 360 publications to date. Dunbar received her B.S. in Chemistry at Westminster College in 1980 followed by her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry in 1984 at Purdue University with professor Richard A. Walton. Dunbar then became a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Inorganic Chemistry with F. Albert Cotton in 1985-1986 at Texas A&M University

The Fred Basolo Medal will be awarded to Kim Dunbar in the fall of 2019 when she will also give her award lecture, scheduled to be delivered during the ACS Chicago Section’s meeting at Northwestern University.